The term e-waste is loosely applied to electrical equipment that is near or at the end of its useful life. Typical products include computers, televisions, mobile phones, DVD players, stereos, photocopy and fax machines as well as "peripherals" such as batteries, printers and cartridges. However, there is no clear definition of e-waste. For example, it has not been determined whether the category should include microwave ovens and similar devices.



E-WASTE

by Cassia Carvalho
translation by Sho Sakai


The term e-waste is loosely applied to electrical equipment that is near or at the end of its useful life. Typical products include computers, televisions, mobile phones, DVD players, stereos, photocopy and fax machines as well as "peripherals" such as batteries, printers and cartridges. However, there is no clear definition of e-waste. For example, it has not been determined whether the category should include microwave ovens and similar devices.

The computer revolution

Just as the atom was promised to be used safely, the initial hope was that the computer revolution would banish one of the plagues of the first industrial revolution by eliminating the problem of rivers and landscapes being contaminated by waste from factories. However, it turns out that the IT revolution, backed by a silent and clean industry driven by silicon chips, has its dark side.

Out of sight and far from the affluent West are landfills for hundreds of millions of computers, televisions, cell phones, stereos, refrigerators and other discarded electronic devices thrown away with increasing speed. The average U.S. computer user is currently replacing his machine every 18-24 months.

From the nooks of mainland China to the rapidly industrializing regions of India and Pakistan, a wide range of equipment is received and recycled under conditions that endanger the health of workers, their communities and the environment.

Most of the components of these devices are recouped by poor collectors and sold for reuse. But during the process, they and the environment around them are exposed to hazards arising from contact with heavy metals like mercury, lead, beryllium, cadmium and bromine leaving lethal residues in their bodies, soil and watercourses.

This is not the type of recycling that consumers have in mind when they dutifully place their computers in the local landfill. Industry experts say that between 50 and 80% of electronic waste collected for recycling ends up in boats with containers intended for e-waste dumps in Asia, where their toxic components end up in blood streams and watercourses.

The life cycle of computer material

Since the '90s the price of computers has plummeted and many have a computer at home and / or work. Although the lifespan of these products is estimated at 10 years, system upgrades, new requirements and the obsolescence of programs and components produce a more accurate lifespan of about 3 or 4 years.  The purchasing of new computer equipment is so cheap that you abandon or store a computer it when it hasn’t yet reached the end of its useful life to buy a new one, ignoring the huge environmental cost that involves both the production and the disposal of computers.

Every day Americans throw away more than 130,000 computers and 350,000 mobile phones, making e-waste the fastest growing type of waste, not only in the U.S., but in all developed countries.

"photos by Empa, ewasteguide.info".

E-Waste's composition 

More important perhaps than the amount of electronic waste is what it actually contains. Modern electrical equipment, for example, is often made of hundreds of different compounds and materials. Many of these components form up hazardous waste. Heavy metals such as lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic are used in electronic equipment, their plastic components have brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and toxic materials found in printer cartridges, to name a few. The threats to human health and to the environment also include the toxic smoke from recycling and leaching processes in landfills and rivers and the desertification of land mining for the extraction of natural resources.

The management of e-waste

There are valuable materials that can be extracted to be reused in the manufacture of electronic products, such as gold and platinum. The problem with e-waste is that the dismantling, separation and processing of these components is difficult and expensive. The hazardous nature of electronic waste along with the associated regulations and the high costs of landfills regularly make the shipping of e-waste abroad a cheaper alternative to reuse and recycling.

In general, developed countries export to developing countries, sometimes under the pretext of aid for the recovery of scrap or refurbishment and resale.
Adopted in 1992, the Basel Convention was started in response to the outrageous international traffic of hazardous waste. More than 150 countries have ratified the Convention. The U.S. is the only industrialized country that refused to ratify it. The Basel Action Network is designed to stop this dumping from rich to poor nations.

The biggest 'Importers'

A lot of e-waste exports end up in Guiyu, China, a recycling centre where peasants heat up circuit boards over charcoal fire to recover lead, while others use acid to burn pieces of gold. According to reports from nearby Shantou University, Guiyu has the highest level of dioxin to cause cancer in the world and high rates of miscarriages. We see women sitting by the fire burning laptop adapters, with rivers of ash draining out of the houses.

Currently, the largest "electronic graveyards" are on the coasts of China and India. There, where environmental policies are less strict, workers (men, women and children) toil daily recycling metals that can be reused, extracting copper from the coils of CRT monitors, gold from some electrical contacts and separating the usable from the unusable without any safety measure, for US $1.50 per day.

©2009 Basel Action Network (BAN). Accra, Ghana, 2009

Environmental and health problems

Some 70% of heavy metals that pollute landfill sites come from improperly disposed electronic equipment. The mercury and cobalt, for example, are toxic by inhalation, ingestion and contact, and chromium is toxic by inhalation and ingestion.

All workers in the electronics industry suffer from health deterioration from exposure to toxic compounds such as chromium (used on the metal covers) which is carcinogenic; another is cadmium (used in rechargeable batteries, contacts and connections monitors, cathode ray tube), which affects the kidneys and bones, mercury (used in flat panel displays within the lighting system) damages the brain and nervous system; lead (contained in a ray tube monitors cathode and welds) causes intellectual impairment, damage to the nervous, reproductive and circulatory system. There are also BFR (used in circuit boards and plastic sheeting) that are neurotoxic and can impair learning and memory. And the list goes on, adding up other toxic substances like the solvents.

Companies know the conditions in which they operate, hence the rotation in positions for welding and repair of circuit boards. Many factories annually shift their workers in those positions due to high concentration of lead fumes, as the air extraction systems are weak or nonexistent.

Problems from the extraction

The history of electronic waste begins in the extraction of raw materials needed for the technology components. Naturally, this chapter of history is not directly responsible for problems related to electronic waste, it simply adds to the tragedy of excessive consumption and the careless disposal of electronic waste.

The coltan

In the eastern mountains of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) there is coltan and niobium, as well as gold, diamonds, copper and tin. Coltan, short for columbium-tantalum, is in soil dating back three billion years ago. Niobium is used to manufacture the capacitors to handle the electrical flow from cell phones. Cobalt and uranium are essential for the nuclear, chemical and aerospace industry and war weapons. About 80% of world reserves of coltan are in Congo.

Their unique properties are superconductivity, ultra-refractory (minerals able to withstand very high temperatures), excellent condensing and high corrosion resistance, making them a privileged material suitable for extraterrestrial use in the International Space Station and future space platforms and databases.

For the control of these scarce minerals there is a war that has lasted 10 years and has killed more than 5.4 million people (only 200,000 of direct war violence). Powerful corporations want to control the mining in the region despite all the violence and the fact that they are destroying the second largest green area of the planet after the also threatened Amazon. 

Due to the large and growing demand for electronics in the Western world, coltan is also in great demand. This economic catalyst has made many militant factions in the DRC participate in a bloody civil war in competition for control of lucrative mining operations and cheap coltan. The over-consumption of electronics feeds the war in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Both adults and children work in stressful working conditions. While many workers argue that the coltan industry provides an income stream to support themselves and their families, the amazing concentration of the nation's dependence on the industry can have dangerous consequences. If the demand for coltan drops, or resources are exhausted, many workers will be left without fundamental skills such as agriculture, threatening the population of the DRC.

Some Alternatives

Reuse and recycling are not the only way to deal with electronic waste. The concept of Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) provides a much more responsible manufacture of electronic products. Removing hazardous inputs increases the accountability of producers throughout the life cycle of their products (e.g. through legislation), requiring producers to take back its products (and implement environmentally and socially responsible solutions), which also requires a better initial design (the incorporation of greater longevity, ability to upgrade, repair and reuse). This will minimize environmental impacts at each stage of the life of a product.

But if we buy from the manufacturers basic 'boxes' containing core components and, at the same time, producers, as part of a long-term agreement service, ensure regular maintenance of the machine and install updated devices when they become available, the 'life expectancy' of computers would then extend to five or more years.

To adopt such an approach it would be necessary to postpone indefinitely the survival strategy of manufacturers to plan short-term obsolescence of their products and to determine the consumer’s preference of relentless new electronic equipment.

However, there remains the difficult task of making people consume in moderation and sobriety. We are filling ourselves with junk due to an almost indiscriminate 'teenager' consumption mentality that generates social and ecological injustices: we discard and hide the trash ‘in the world’s backyard’ where it’s not seen, causing serious pollution problems and perpetuating abusive and unfair practices against workers from economically depressed areas.

The excessive consumption of western society, coupled with the inefficiency of the relevant agencies to recycle and reuse all types of waste, is a lethal combination for our planet and us.

©2008 Basel Action Network (BAN). Guiyu, China

E-WASTE(電子産業廃棄物)

E-WASTE(電子産業廃棄物)という言葉をご存知だろうか。これは寿命を迎えようとしている電子機器全般に適用される言葉で、廃棄されたコンピューター、テレビ、携帯電話、DVDプレイヤー、ステレオ、コピー機、ファックス等を指すものだ。また電池やプリンターのカートリッジ等に使用される場合もある。ただし明確な定義付けがされた言葉でないことも事実で、電子レンジ等の製品についても含むべきかについては依然結論が出ていない。

コンピューター革命

原子力が当初安全なものと考えられていた事と同様に、コンピューターは第一次産業革命によってもたらされた数々の問題、すなわち環境汚染(工場廃液によって汚染された川は枚挙に暇がないほど)を解決する救世主だと信じられてきた。

しかし近年、シリコンチップによって推進されたこの一見クリーンな産業の暗い側面がクローズアップされてきている。

豊かな西側諸国で廃棄されるパソコン、テレビ、携帯電話、ステレオ、冷蔵庫等の電気製品・電子機器の数は年々増しており、アメリカの平均的なユーザーは18~24ヶ月で新しいパソコンに買い換えるというデータもある。

廃棄されたパソコンは、中国の片隅や急速に工業化を進めているインドやパキスタンにあるリサイクル工場に送られる事になる。そこで問題になるのは、これらの工場が非常に劣悪な環境の下で運営されており、従業員の健康被害を起こし、地域社会の住環境を破壊していることだ。

廃棄されたパソコンの部品は再利用のために分解され、回収される。しかしその作業の途中で排出される水銀や鉛、ベリリウムやカドミウムといった有害な重金属に対する対策は全くといってよいほど採られておらず、従業員の健康や周辺環境を危険にさらしている。

これは「リサイクル」という言葉を聞いたときに我々がイメージするクリーンな世界とは全く異なるリサイクルの現実だ。専門家によるとリサイクルに集められた電子廃棄物のうち50%~80%がアジア諸国にある産業廃棄物処理場に送られており、周辺に住む住民の健康を脅かしているという。

コンピューターのライフサイクル

90年代からパソコンの値段は下降を続けており、既にパソコンはオフィスや家庭において一般的なものとなっている。平均的なパソコンの寿命は10年間と言われてはいるものの、頻繁なソフトウェアのアップデートや度重なるOSの更新によって、現実的には3~4年使えれば良いという状況だ。さらに価格の下落によって、消費者は環境へのコストを省みることなく、短期間にパソコンを買い換えている。

アメリカ人が廃棄するパソコンの量は一日130,000台以上に上り、さらに35,000台以上の携帯が捨てられている。この傾向はアメリカのみならず西側の先進諸国で共通して見られる現象であり、パソコンは世界でもっとも早い速度で増加している産業廃棄物となっている。

E-WASTEに含まれる危険物質

その量もさることながら、廃棄物に含まれている有害物質による汚染も深刻な問題だ。e-wasteは多数の異なる物質から成り立っているが、その大半が人体や環境に悪影響を与える有害な物質だ。特に、鉛、カドミウム、水銀、などの重金属や、プリンターカートリッジに使用されるBFRなどは極めて危険な環境汚染をもたらす。また、リサイクル工場から排出される煙や埋め立てによる土壌や河川の汚染も深刻な問題だ。

E-WASTEの管理体制

金やプラチナのように、廃棄物の中には再利用することで貴重な資源として活用できるものも混ざっている。しかしこれらの素材を分離することは技術的、また資金的に非常に困難な作業である。そして結局のところ、再利用を図るよりも海外へ送り廃棄してしまうことの方が優先順位が高くなる。

先進国から途上国への廃棄物の移送は、先進国側によるスクラップの補助や回収作業の支援を前提に行われる。これは危険な産業廃棄物の流れを止めるために開催された1992年のバーゼル会議において決められたポリシーに基づくものだ。しかし、既に150以上の国がこの決まりを批准しているにもかかわらず、最大の廃棄物排出国である米国は未だにこのポリシーの批准を拒否している。バーゼルアクションネットワークが富める国による、貧しい国への廃棄物の流れを止めるために組織される一方で、米国環境保護庁(EPA)はテレビや古いモニターに利用される電光管しか管理していないのが現状だ。

最大の「輸入者」

E-WASTEの最大の受け入れ先は中国のGuiyuだ。この地域では、農民が鉛を取り出すために炭火を使って基盤を焼き、金を取り出すために酸を使う。Guiyu地区の 隣にある山東大学の調査によると、Guiyu地区はダイオキシンによる汚染率が世界一で、流産の率もきわめて高い。我々が訪れた時には、ラップトップのアダプターを灰で汚染された川沿いで焼いている女性を見かけた。

世界最大規模の「電子機器の墓場」は、中国とインドの沿岸地域に広がっている。環境規制が緩いこれらの地域では、子供を含む男女の労働者が、亜鉛をCRTモニターから摘出したり、廃棄物から金を抽出したりといった危険な作業になんら防護策をとることなく従事している。しかし彼らの賃金は一日1.50ドルに満たないのだ。

環境汚染と健康被害

70%以上の重金属は非合法に廃棄された電気製品から発生している。水銀やコバルトは、吸い込みや、触れることで人体に有害な影響を及ぼす。

実際、電気業界で働く労働者の大半が有害物質による健康被害を受けている。例えば鉄のカバーに使われるクロミウムや、充電電池やモニターの配線、テレビのチューブに使われるカドミウムは骨や肝臓に影響を与える。さらに、脳や神経に影響するものもある。パソコンの基盤やプラスチックのシーティングに使われるBFRは、神経を侵し、記憶力や学習能力を低下させる。さらにソルバンツ等のような物質の危険性については言うまでもない。

電子機器を製造する会社はこのような状況を十分把握しており、基盤を製造するラインの労働者を定期的にローテーションさせることで対策を採っている。この定期的なローテーションは、鉛の蓄積を防ぐためではあるが、有効な換気システムが整備されていない事実の裏返しでもある。

原料の抽出に伴う問題

電子廃棄物の歴史は、原料素材抽出の歴史でもある。この章で扱う内容は、電子廃棄物に直接由来する問題というよりは、その問題をさらに深刻にする問題と言えるだろう。

The coltan(コルタン)

コンゴ民主共和国の東の山地にコルタンとニオビウム、そして金、ダイヤモンド、亜鉛、鉛の鉱山がある。コルタンはコロンビアムタンタリウムの短縮形で、三億年以上もの昔から地中に埋まっていたものだ。ニビウムは主に携帯電話において電子の流れを制御するのに使われている。コバルトやウランは原子力やケミカル、そして航空業界や軍事業界で非常に重宝される物質だ。そして全世界の80%のコルタンはコンゴにあるといわれている。

これらの物質は、熱伝導率の高さや極限の環境にも変化しない性質から、コンデンサーとして優れた性質を持つ。また、宇宙空間などの環境での使用に最適であり、宇宙ステーションや未来の宇宙のプラットフォームに使われる素材だ。

その一方、コンゴではこの貴重な天然資源をめぐり、これまで10年以上もの間紛争が続き、540万もの人々の命が失われた。そのうち実際の戦闘で死亡したものは20万人に過ぎない。巨大な多国籍企業はこれらの地域の炭鉱をコントロールすることを狙っており、それによって世界でアマゾンに次ぎ2番目に広大な緑地を失わせる結果となっている。

西側諸国からの増え続けるニーズにより、コルタンの需要は高まるが、この物質によりもたらされる富を巡りコンゴ民主共和国は長年にわたる内戦を続けている。つまり、電子機器の使用がコンゴ共和国の戦争の一助となっている訳だ。

コルタン炭鉱では、労働者は安定した収入の見返りに、大人も子供も非常に劣悪な環境の下で働いている。また、この産業に対する極端な労働力の集中は、コルタンの需要が減った場合や資源が底を尽きた場合、コンゴ民主共和国を危機へと導くだろう。

未来に向けての選択肢

リサイクルや再生だけが電子廃棄物に対処する唯一の方法ではない。EPR(製造者責任)の考え方は、製造業者の廃棄物に関する責任をこれまで以上に明確に示すものだ。ある製品のライフサイクルの全ての段階における危険物質の除去に関する責任を製造者へ帰す事で、製造者には製品設計の段階から製品寿命の長期化、アップグレード可能性の強化、修理、再生可能性の拡大を追及するインセンティブが働く。これにより電子機器の環境への影響を最小化することが出来るのだ。

また我々消費者としては、製造会社から核となる装置のみを搭載した「ボックス」を購入し、同時に製造者に長期間のサービス契約を結ばせた上で定期的なメンテナンスとアップグレードパッチの提供を実施させる事でパソコンの寿命を更に5年は延ばすことができる。

このアプローチにおいては、製造会社が短期間で寿命を迎えるような製品を作る事を止め、消費者が最新の電子機器を追い続ける事を止める必要がある。

我々消費者も消費に対してより節度を保ち自覚的になることが求められる。10代の頃のように自分の周囲をジャンクで埋め尽くすのではなく、社会的、経済的な不正を助長するような消費を改める必要がある。我々の眼が届かない世界の裏庭にゴミを捨てる行為は、その地域に住んでいる労働者の健康を脅かし、経済的に追い詰めることになるのだ。

西側諸国による行過ぎた消費と、非効率なリサイクルは我々の星に危機的な影響を与えているのだ。